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Interview: Buganda Land Board’s Mr. Ndawula Barnabas explains what ‘Wetuukire’ campaign is all about.

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Buganda Land Board Head of Legal Mr. Ndawula Barnabas

Buganda Land Board Head of Legal, Mr. Ndawula Barnabas

Buganda Land Board Head of Legal, Mr. Ndawula Barnabas explains in detail what the recently launched Wetuukire campaign is all about. Read the interview excerpts below.

Buganda Land Board recently launched a campaign dubbed ‘Wetuukire’. Please tell us what the campaign is all about.

‘Wetuukire’ is a campaign that is calling upon all persons currently in possession of land titles on Kabaka’s land, which were formerly issued by Uganda Land Commission and District Land Boards to regularize their tenancy with Buganda Land Board. The campaign is scheduled to start on March 1st and will end on April 30th 2016.

What do you exactly mean by Kabaka’s land and what areas does it cover?

Kabaka’s land refers to all that land vested in the Kabaka of Buganda by virtue of his office and held in custody for the people of Buganda. Kabaka’s land includes:

 The Kings official estate ‘Olusuku lwa Ssabasajja’ measuring 350 square miles covering the counties of Kyadondo, Busiiro, Kyagwe, including such areas as Munyonyo and Makindye and Buziga.

 It also covers all land that was managed and controlled by the Buganda Land Board as a creature of the 1962 constitution of Uganda, which entails urban and peri-urban areas of municipalities and towns in Buganda kingdom.

 It also includes the Sazza and Gomboloola estates measuring 8 square miles and 49 acres respectively found in all districts of Buganda covering some parts of Mukono, Wakiso and Kampala and different areas within rural/up country districts in Buganda region.

How is it that persons were able to obtain titles on Kabaka’s land in the first place?

Individuals did get hold of titles on Kabaka’s land especially lease titles by way of interests created by Uganda Land Commission and the District Land Boards.

Wasn’t the issuance of such titles by Uganda Land Commission and District Land Boards legally binding?

In light of the prevailing circumstances at the time, one may say that technically it was legal because it was state sanctioned. The Central Government under the Obote-I Republican constitution of 1967 confiscated Buganda Kingdom assets, of which land was the largest. The 1967 constitution also created the Uganda Land Commission which was given the mandate to manage all public land, of which the confiscated Buganda Kingdom land was among. This was further escalated by the 1975 Land Decree which declared all land to be public land and vested the same in the State to be held in trust for the people of Uganda and to be administered by the Uganda Land Commission. Further still, in 1998 District Land Boards were created and given further mandate to manage land within their respective districts.

If the titles were legal then, what is the rationale behindBuganda Land Board’s regularization of tenancy on the same land now?

Buganda Land Board is regularizing tenancy on the land becausethe land was officially handed back to Kabaka’s Government. In 1993, the Government of Uganda through the Traditional Rulers Restitution of Assets and Properties Act Cap 247 entered various legally binding agreements with Buganda Kingdom culminating into a memorandum of understanding between themselves in 2013 under which various land titles and properties were officially returned to the Kabaka.

Are there any repercussions that can affect tenants who haven’t had their titles validated by BLB?

Yes, it is vital for title holders to have their titles validated because Buganda Land Board is now the controlling authority of the land. As the authority, Buganda Land Board needs to know the tenants currently residing on the land. Once BLB has the knowledge of the tenancy and has authenticated the tenancy, the title holder will enjoy security of tenure guaranteed by BLB.

In addition, financial institutions and Commercial Banks are now accepting only those land titles on Kabaka’s land that have been validated by Buganda Land Board. Furthermore, all transactions to include the sale, exchange or donation of land with titles on Kabaka’s land are now rendered invalid by law, if not consented to by Buganda Land Board.

Does this mean that Buganda Land Board wants to evict tenants off Kabaka’s land through the Wetuukire campaign?

‘Wetuukire’ campaign is an initiative by Buganda Land Board to ensure that all tenants on Kabaka’s land enjoy peaceful and economically sustainable use of the land they occupy. Buganda Land Board is therefore not chasing anyone off Kabaka’s land. We are simply acting within our mandate and calling upon all tenants on Kabaka’s land that received land titles issued by Uganda Land Commission and District Land Boards to come and regularize their land titles with Buganda Kingdom, this is both free hold and Lease titles.

In brief, are you saying that one cannot buy /sell or mortgage this land in a legally binding manner unless and until the same has been validated by BLB?

The simple answer to that is YES! It is therefore entirely to the benefit of the title holder to heed to our call to have their land title regularized at this point to avoid inconveniences in the future. All those that don’t comply will handled within the existing law.

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Interviews

Northern Rapper Of The Year O.P.U KOBOKOBOY Speaks about Life In The Village and New Music

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By Staff Writer

  • What have you been up?

I took some time off and went looking for inspiration in other areas of life. Moved back to Koboko in June 2017 been here since for about 2 years and 1 month. 

  • Moved back of Koboko? What inspired that move? 

I lived in Kampala my whole life and needed to get away from the noise and hustle of the big city, I needed to reset.  I believe that Kampala is already divided in terms of business opportunities, it already has business men like Patrick Bitatrure and Sudir who have defined the business world by running so many businesses in different fields. They have defined Kampala. However this is not the case in the West Nile there are many businesses that are yet to be established and I would like to be a part of that next wave. 

Aside from that I just wanted to connect with my roots. 

  • We saw on your social media handles as you documented this change as you closed your apartments in Kampala and urban Koboko, how was that change for you?

It was exciting and scary but needed to be done and I have now been living in the village for the last 4 weeks. The village is everything I thought it would be, it very quiet and peaceful. I get a lot of time to read and reflect. I finally got a TV after 4 years of living with no TV, so am really enjoying watching local TV, I feel like my TV connects me to the rest of the world. I have got a chance to get learn my history better. Overall this change was overdue. I have also got a lot time to listen to my podcasts.    

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  • We see you of late posting a lot under the hash tag Camp-Ludaville, what can you tell us about this?

One of my plans is set up a camping site in Koboko and we are in the process of making this reality, we hope to be open soon and are currently getting everything in place we hope to be open before the end of the year. With Camp Ludaville we also hope to expose the other beautiful tourism attractions in Koboko and the West Nile in general. This is going to be the first camp site in the West Nile and am very excited to be a part of this project. Looking forward to seeing how this will unfold.

We shall be opening our doors soon and will let the public know.   

  • Tell us about the Made in West Nile Tee-Shirt Line? 

The Made In West Nile brand is bigger than a merchandise brand, to me it’s a reflection of a state of mind showing where the West Nile is heading with this new millennial generation of West Nile youth. It is up to us the millennials and Gen Z generation to build a new modern identity for the West Nile to do that we have to build new and beautiful things from the West and export them to the world. MADE IN WEST NILE is just the start of a beautiful story in the making.

For now though we have started with the  Made In West Nile T-Shirts that are on sale at a very low price of 20,000 UGX and can be delivered anywhere in the world. We look at these t-shirts as a statement of pride for those coming from the West Nile.     

  • In December of 2018, we saw that you expanded your business portfolio by venturing into the Silent Disco business, what can you tell us about that venture?

 Well I got inspired to venture into the business after attending a few silent disco events myself in Kampala. I got the inspiration to replicate the experience in the West Nile, at the time of our first silent disco we were the first to pull of an event of that nature in Koboko. The brand name of the event is called the “West Nile Silent Disco” and we have been able to hold 6 editions so far. The idea was to bring this new technology in entertainment to the West Nile and we at West Nile Entertainment are committed to creating new experiences in this region. I have acquired some silent disco headphones that are open for hire for any readers out there if in need.

One of the challenges is that we had to introduce the people in Koboko to a relatively to a new entertainment concept that costed a lot more than what they are used to paying a ticket costed 30,000 Ugx per ticket at an upscale hotel out of town plus we also pushed for early bird ticket purchases and these were all new to the masses but the few that got the concept enjoyed our level of service delivery and look forward to future editions.

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  • You began 2019 by winning the award for “Northern Rapper of the Year” at the 3rd MTN Hip Hop Awards. Tell us about that experience.

Well I have been nominated in the previous awards in the past years in a number of categories but this was the first that I won at. I think moving back to Koboko played a big role in getting me that award because I have been able to make music that relates with my people who have in turn become fans and built for me a more loyal fan base than before and that’s how we won.  The West Nile radio stations have also played a big role getting my music played more frequently and this massive radio rotation has been a major factor in my growth and I will always be thankful to all the media personas and fans, it’s with their support that I won that award.   

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  • We saw a picture of you on social media with Gbaraspoken and Rappa BlueTit under the hashtag Coko_Coko_Clan, what is that about?

For that you will have to wait and see.      

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  • You have been questioned for taking too long to release new music, what is your thought process when putting out new music and is there any new music?

For me its quality over quantity, my focus is to make music that carries a long term message and will last for the taste of time. I have only put out so far 4 songs on West Nile radio which were Alemi, Akamine, Dear Listener, and Nyege Nyege Turn Up. Now look at what we have been able to do with only 4 songs now ask yourself what we are going to able to do when we reach song number  10.I guess time will tell. But I think it will be massive. As for the new music yes, there is new music on the way, I did a song with Pasha and Andy Music, the song is called “Number Alu”, it will be on radio soon. Also the music video to “Dear Listener” is ready we will be dropping it soon for now everyone should subscribe to my YouTube channel or visit www.kobokoboy.com.The music video to Nyege Nyege Turn Up featuring Kemishan is also ready and should be out soon. 

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Interviews

Interview: One on one with the first ever SafeBoda rider

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Moses Musinguzi, the first ever SafeBoda rider.

By Our Reporter

He has been elusive to many. But we have finally managed to locate the first ever SafeBoda rider. He is a lively young man, with a charming smile. We had a chat with him about his journey thus far as a SafeBoda rider and here are the excerpts:

Tell us a bit about yourself

My name is Moses Musinguzi. I was born in Kasese, and I am 29 years old.

I completed my senior six at City High school in 2009, but couldn’t continue with further studies because university tuition was very high. I could not manage to support myself, so I instead decided to use my savings to start a business, and I later ended up as a bodaboda rider.

I am the first ever SafeBoda rider; you can call me SafeBoda 01.

What were you doing before SafeBoda?

Before joining SafeBoda, I was a business man.

I joined the BodaBoda industry in 2007 as a motorcycle mechanic. I also used to monitor my father’s Bodaboda business; he used to give out motorcycles on lease, and I was in charge of collecting the payment.

I later opened up my own motorcycle spare parts shop. But, in 2013, the business collapsed and that’s how I ended up as a Bodaboda rider.

How did you end up with SafeBoda?

Early 2014, I ran into a former client of mine for whom I used to repair motorcycles, who also happened to be the co-founder SafeBoda, Ricky Thomson. He told me about his idea, and I liked it because he told me that it would improve the image of the Bodaboda industry.

He told me that we were going to be provided with two helmets and reflector jackets, and then we would build a community of like-minded riders, gain people’s trust, and make it a premium service.

Having dropped out of school, I wanted to associate with a brand that would make me proud among my former colleagues hence I decided to work with safeboda.

What has the journey been like for you?

It has been as exciting as it has been challenging.

I joined safeBoda in 2014 as the onboarding officer and was charged with interviewing, training and recruiting riders. In 2015, I became the Driver Technology manager and was helping trouble shoot any problems riders had with using the SafeBoda platform. I later went on to join the driver engagement and support team which is about maintaining riders on the platform. But because the numbers have grown, we split up driver engagement and support and I am now leading the driver support team.

All this time, I have been a part time SafeBoda rider and also employee. But I am finally resting my motorcycle to become a full time employee.

I will miss being an active Bodaboda rider. I used to love meeting all those amazing people, but I have to specialize now and work on my personal goals. Although I will not be in the field, I will still continue to serve them indirectly.

Moses Musinguzi, the first ever SafeBoda rider.

What has been your biggest challenges as a SafeBoda rider?

My biggest challenge so far has been harassment from other riders who have not embraced the platform. Mostly the harassment has been verbal. For instance, when we stop at the traffic lights they hurl insults at you as they tell you to get out of their way. They see us as traitors because we offer low fares to customers.

What have been your biggest achievements as a SafeBoda rider?

With SafeBoda, I have learnt to be more professional. For instance, I have be trained on how to handle customers better, received first aid training and also learnt how to interact with technology.

Because of SafeBoda, I also no longer have to hide from my former school colleagues because I am no longer seen as a failure and this makes me proud.

Finally, I have also managed to construct a fully furnished 3-bedroom house, and I am also paying school fees for my kids.

Where do you see yourself in 5 years?

I am planning to go back to school and complete university where I will pursue a Bachelor’s degree in data science or project planning and management. My dream is to become a renowned data analyst.

My second goal is to reestablish my old business, which I will run parallel with new position at SafeBoda.

What is your advice to fellow SafeBoda riders?

My advice to fellow riders is to stay away from things that consume their income. They should learn how to save and invest. They can always take on investments which are not high risk for example investing in another motorcycle.

Secondly, they should learn to treat customers better and abide by the SafeBoda rules so that they can stay on the platform which allows them to earn more.



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Entertainment News

Capital Kitchen: First luxurious and exclusive eatery opens in Kampala this Saturday July 28 2018

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Capital Kitchen (CK) an authentic World Kitchen inspired by the best in the food industry in the world has opened its first outlet in Kampala.

The World Class kitchen, an ultra-modern investment located on the storeyed Thobani Centre on Jinja Road, opposite Orient House, offers an exclusive and indulgent dining experience like never before. It is ideal for people who value class and also want a bit of a bargain.

According to Ashish Sharma, the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of Capital Kitchen, they are inspired by best in food industry around the world and will bring a variety of fresh food on the menu.

He explains that Capital Kitchen is bringing eight of the best moving contemporary cuisines under one roof.

“Our buffet concept is on the next level. We take pride in confirming that we are creating a niche in food industry of Sub Saharan Africa by bringing down 8 best moving contemporary cuisines under one roof. This will be in a highly authentic and affordable manner, Sharma reveals.

He also says that Capital Kitchen’s core value is to provide a pampering experience for customers by providing trendy and world class foods picked from cuisines around the world.

Some of the outstanding cuisines include Brazilian Churasico, Live authentic tandoor, Turkish grill and pastry display.

They have not forgotten on the indigenous Ugandan afraid to try out other exotic foods.

“We are getting ready to serve in such a way so that one can enjoy anything from the get the best African grills to the mouth melting tandoori kebabs. We shall also have the tempting Shawarma /Turkish kebabs, the Teepynyaki/sushi/ Dimsum/legendary stir fry and the Thai cuisine. All these will be part of our food theatre live buffet.

Sharma explains that aside from the buffets, customers will also enjoy bite-sized morsels of homemade cakes, comforting puddings, creamy profiteroles, fresh fruit and gelato galore.

“We also have the stuff that dreams are made of. We have the legendary chocolate fountain, featuring cascading Swiss milk chocolate and a selection of fresh fruit and marshmallows waiting to be enjoyed,”

He explains that for starters Capital Kitchen is out to sell to Kampala an experience and as such, immediate profits are secondary.

Sharma explains: “Our prices are unbelievable low. The price regimen rolls one buffet ticket concept where client can eat everything /anything they can from that massive spread at only sh40, 000

Apart from the one ticket offering Capital Kitchen has also brought more than twenty (20) pre plated meal platters (7 course cuisine based meals) of legendary cuisines for only 20,000.

For more information, contact 0781237890



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