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OPINION: Why Shimoni Demo School Is Uganda’s Greatest Primary School?

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By Ian Ortega

No one is coming to save you. No one will give you the job of your dreams. No one will build you the house of your dreams. No one will hand you these things on a silver plate. You have to look the world in the face and demand for what you want, for what you deserve. If you’ve put in the hard-work, the persistence, the intelligence, the world must answer to these demands.

Lots of people try to hide their past. Lots of people never want to talk about those moments when they were still at nothing. But those are the moments I enjoy talking about. I love to speak more about my failures than my successes. Because my failures, my struggles, make me.

I went to Primary School at Shimoni Demonstration School (formerly Indian Primary School). I spent 7 years in a school with a population of over 5000 students. At one time, it was believed to be the most populated School in Africa if not the world. That school made me.

It taught me from early on, that if anything was going to be, it had to be about me. Break time was a struggle, you had to fight your way through the canteen. You had to dodge tens of teachers to finish the week without a spanking. To have no crime in Shimoni was to play it too safe. I will never forget the time one teacher caned us for not having 95% which he said was the passmark for his exam aka D1. Even though it was a UPE School (having been changed to UPE when I was in P.5), that school had teachers that were committed to their work. And so, I learned a lot going to that school. My father always wanted otherwise. He felt I shouldn’t have gone to Shimoni, my mother insisted I had to complete the tradition since most of my cousins had gone through Shimoni.

Pupils of Shimoni Demo School  in class.

Pupils of Shimoni Demo School in class.

Long before the rise of schools such as Kampala Parents and Bright Grammer, it was Nakasero, Shimoni, Kitante, Buganda Road that ruled the day. That explains why I joined Shimoni.

But how do you stand out in a population of over 5000 students? How do you stand out in sports, in music, in academics or in anything? Shimoni was like a pool of the very best all being brought to one place.

It taught me one thing, you can make it anywhere. Ours was the last year at Shimoni before government chose to shift the school to Kololo. It also marked the end of the great civilization. If I am not mistaken, Shimoni was the 5th best in Uganda in the PLE results of that year.

Today, I meet most people in my class who’ve gone on to do wonders. I think I am the luckiest person to have gone to that school. Nothing, I repeat no experience will ever come next to Shimoni. I will never forget that evening football that I played by the Sub-way grounds just opposite Parliament. I will never forget how we easily entered Parliament and greeted Ministers. The guards were not paranoid, they assumed we were kids of MPs. Some times we would end up in Radio Uganda studios. And when Garden City opened, we would spend our Saturdays there. There were the golf-course grounds. We stepped onto the golf course before we ever got membership to those exclusive clubs. Of course, these were crimes at the school, but we were kids, we could get away with anything. I can’t count the tens of times I walked into Uganda Bookshop, picked any book I wanted and no one stopped me. That was the beginning of my passion for reading.

Above all, Shimoni taught me the value of independence, the value of not being a cry-baby. It was either you win, or you get lost in the statistics. There was no other option. Since then, I don’t wait for life to act and bring opportunities my way, I go out and make those opportunities. If I want someone, I go out look for ways to meet them. If I want something, I work for it. I don’t care how long it takes, if you stick long enough, you eventually get what you deserve.

So why did I write this? To say that SHIMONI is the greatest Primary School in the history of Uganda. Save your arguments for other platforms. Nothing comes next to Shimoni. It’s the goddess of all Primary Schools in Uganda. An eighth day should be added to the week. That day should be named Shimoni and on that day we shall speak no word except one in praise of Shimoni!!! We shall worship the school that was, the school that is responsible for Ugandan Civilization!!!

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Opinion

Opinion: NBS taking over the social scene

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NBS TV logo

By Our Reporter

Have you realized how over the last few months, all the big concerts and social events have moved to have the Next Media companies, especially NBS Television and NXT Radio, as media sponsors?

From Blankets & Wine to Purple Party, the Burna Boy concert, Don Moen, Chris Martin & D’Major concert, Bakiga Nation, Nyege Nyege, to mention but a few. East Africa has Got Talent could be an addition here, this time as a show that trusted NBS Television to be the platform that will deliver maximum impact across Uganda.

NBS Television might have become Uganda’s leading TV station by being the political command center, but they have really evolved to be a major presence on the social scene as well lately.

But this doesn’t come as a total surprise. Over the last month or so, a one Renny Byamugisha, formerly in charge of on-trade marketing at NXT Radio, was promoted to take care of the same for the whole of Next Media Services, and NBS Television seem to be the biggest beneficiaries of the move so far.

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Celebrity Gossip

Opinion: What Solomon Serwanjja’s AIBs win means for NBS Television’s investigations desk

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Solomon Serwanjja

The hashtag, #NBSInvestigates, is a usual fixture among Ugandan trends online, with some of the most impactful news stories in Ugandan journalism history aired on the segment. It airs during NBS Television’s Monday edition of Live at 9, their prime news bulletin.

Solomon Serwanjja is only one of the investigative reporters that contribute to it, and his piece, done in conjunction with BBC Africa Eye, “Stealing from the Sick”, won a major international award – the Association for International Broadcasting (AIBs) Investigative Documentary Award.

This comes after Solomon Serwanjja was named the 2019 BBC Africa Komla Dumor Award that has him currently training with the BBC in London, England.

At the AIBs, “Stealing from the Sick” was nominated alongside some strong pieces like, Fault Lines – Targeted by a Text by Al Jazeera English, War Crimes for Likes by BBC Arabic Documentaries, Disasters at Sea – Coffin Ship by Exploration Production Inc., Inside Facebook: Secrets of the Social Network by Firecrest Films for Channel 4, The Atom Araullo Specials Babies4sale – Philippines by GMA Network Inc., and Wie is Schild & Vrienden echt? (Who are the Real Shield & Friends?) by VRT NWS.

That a Ugandan story is nominated among these is a milestone, that it wins is a major landmark for Ugandan TV at large, let alone the Investigative desk at NBS Television.

In the story, Serwanjja exposed the plight of Ugandan malaria patients who continue to suffer because of lack of access to drugs, with some even losing their lives, at the hands of government officials who steal and sell the drugs meant to be given out for.

But this is only one story. Some of the other pieces on #NBSInvestigates that moved the nation have also included Inside the Makerere University Sex-for-Marks Scandal by Raymond Mujuni, The Gang Terrorizing Kampala(Kifeesi) by Solomon Serwanjja, Girls in Risky Business by Canary Mugume, among others.

With the major wins by a man who is widely regarded as the one that started the investigative journalism at the Lower-Kololo-based station, I suspect coming investigations will be carried in even higher regard going forward… Maybe the next few pieces’ adverts should now start with, “From the producers of the major award-winning Stealing of the Sick…”

Staff Writer

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Celebrity Gossip

3 Reasons why the blame on Martha Kay and other women whose nudes leak is misdirected

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Martha Kay

By Bash Mutumba

In recent times, nothing excites Ugandans more than a leak of raunchy content; mostly the kind that involves a public figure. After the men recreationally finish the soap in their bathrooms, and the women envying and/or judging their fellow women’s bodies, the next step is usually to blame the victims of how irresponsible they are for letting their nudes leak, and often go on and on blaming them for taking these photos and/or videos in the first place. I’ll tell you why this blame is misdirected.

1. They don’t leak them themselves

In all honesty, of all the nudes and sextapes that leak, the ones that ask for them – who are also the only intended consumers – are usually the romantic partners, and it is very absurd that the blame is never laid on these particular individuals. The guy who leaked Zari’s video never paid for his sins, Desire Luzinda’s Nigerian lover was sure nothing would be done to him, Anita Fabiola’s offender too was never brought to book. Same applies to Judith Heard and now Martha Kay.

2. They are the victims

It is rather clear that cyber bullying isn’t something to joke about, as we have all witnessed friends and family succumb to depression after episodes of being bullied on social media. The best that can be done for such people is to show them they are loved, regardless of the betrayal they have faced at the hands of those they loved and trusted. Making fun, and threats of legal action and jail, aren’t the best words to tell to someone in a situation of being prone to mental health issues.

3. Ugandans should have rights to privacy

The whole essence of having mobile phones is privacy. They are not shared like landlines or pay phones, and the passwords therein, are ultimately to that effect. Ideally, every Ugandan should be able to take photos that empower them, without fearing that someone will encroach on their privacy.

I personally felt so sad when various people created fake pages in the name of Martha Kay just to get followers riding on her sorrow. It is needless to say, that we should spread love, not hate.

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